Downgrading a DigitalOcean Droplet with ServerPilot & WordPress

If you are a WordPress admin looking for a way to downgrade your DigitalOcean droplet, you probably came across their article How To Downgrade DigitalOcean Droplets, which tells you to use rsync to move files from your old droplet to the new droplet. If you are using using ServerPilot to manage your DigitalOcean server, do not follow these instructions. ServerPilot has an article called Cloning and Resizing Servers that explicitly tells you not to use rsync. There are a few problems with rsync – basically, it will not correctly clone your ServerPilot configuration, so your new site will not work. Here’s a more automated method using a WordPress plugin called ManageWP, which I found to be a better solution:

  1. Create a new server on Digital Ocean – do this using the smaller subscription that you want to downgrade to.
  2. Connect the new server to Server Pilot
  3. Install WordPress with one click on the new server
  4. Install Manage WP on both sites (you need to install the plugin under the same account in both sites – just do the sections titled Install the ManageWP Worker Plugin and Set Up ManageWP).
  5. Migrate WordPress with Manage WP 
  6. Go to the new IP address in a browser and verify that it works
  7. Update DNS records with GoDaddy to point to the new site

If you found this useful or have any feedback on this process, leave a comment!

The journey to simple and good

I have 12 days until I start at Hack Reactor, a software development bootcamp here in San Francisco. It’s an intensive, three month dive into full-stack web development. The idea is to immerse oneself in code, build a community of like-minded engineers, and mostly, to learn how to learn. While it sounds like a simple idea, adopting the mindset of a self-supported learner is not always easy. But I’m looking forward to the challenge, and I’m stoked about expanding my knowledge at a rapid pace.

I’ve heard it said that visual artists follow a typical progression as they gain skill:

simple & bad -> complex & bad -> complex & good -> simple & good

In my experience, this applies to code as well. Here’s to the journey towards simple and good.